Fewer NEET young people

Young People Not in Education, Employment or Training (NEET), November 2013

  • There were 1.07 million young people (aged from 16 to 24) in the UK who were Not in Education, Employment or Training (NEET), down 19,000 from April to June 2013 and down 28,000 from a year earlier
  • The percentage of all young people in the UK who were NEET was 14.9%, down 0.2 percentage points from April to June 2013 and down 0.3 percentage points from a year earlier.
  • Just over half (55.0%) of all young people in the UK who were NEET were looking for work and available for work and therefore classified as unemployed. The remainder were either not looking for work and/or not available for work and therefore classified as economically inactive.
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European unemployment

European unemployment, May 2013: Eurostat

  • The euro area (EA17) seasonally-adjusted unemployment rate3 was 12.1% in May 2013, up from 12.0% in April
  • The EU27 unemployment rate was 10.9%, stable compared with the previous month
  • In both zones, rates have  risen markedly compared with May 2012, when they were 11.3% and 10.4% respectively
  • 26.405 million men and women in the EU27, of whom 19.222 million were in the euro area,  were unemployed in May 2013.
  • Compared with April 2013, the number of persons unemployed increased by 16 000 in the EU27 and by 67 000 in the euro area.
  • Compared with May 2012, unemployment rose by 1.324 million in the EU27 and by 1.344 million in the euro area.
  • In May 2013, 5.501 million young persons (under 25) were unemployed in the EU27, of whom 3.531 million were in the euro area.
  • Compared with May 2012, youth unemployment decreased by 77 000 in the EU27 and increased by 60 000 in the euro area.
  • In May 2013, the youth unemployment rate was 23.0% in the EU27 and 23.8% in the euro area, compared with 22.8% and 23.0% respectively in May 2012.

Global employment trends for youth

Global Employment Trends for Youth 2013: ILO

  • 73.4 million young people – 12.6 % – are expected to be out of work in 2013, an increase of 3.5 million between 2007 and 2013.
  • The global youth unemployment rate is projected to reach 12.8 per cent by 2018
  • In advanced economies, the youth unemployment rate in 2012 was 18.1 per cent. It is likely to remain above 17 per cent until 2015 and is not predicted to drop below 17 per cent before 2016. In Greece and Spain, more than half of the economically active youth population is unemployed.
  • The share of young people being out of work for at least six months is also increasing. In the OECD countries, more than one third of young, unemployed persons were classified “long-term unemployed” in 2011 – up from one quarter of the unemployed in 2008.
  • The number of NEETs in advanced economies – those neither in employment, nor education or training is growing and stands at one in six – putting them at risk of labour market and social exclusion.

Young people not in employment, education or training are more than twice as likely to feel unable to cope as their peers

Youth Index 2013: The Princes Trust

  • One in ten young people feel they cannot cope with day-to-day life
  • Young people not in employment, education or training (NEETs) are more than twice as likely to feel unable to cope as their peers.
  • More than one in five young people (22 per cent) did not have someone to talk to about their problems while they were growing up.
  • 27 per cent of young people in work feel down or depressed ‘always’ or ‘often’, and this increases to almost half (48 per cent) among NEETs

Youth Employment: what works

Youth Employment: what works: ILO

  • Programmes that guarantee young people will get a job, education or training have shown good results in a number of countries.
  • Technical and vocational education and training (TVET) can play a central role in preparing young people for work, provided the programmes reflect labour market needs.
  • Anticipating future skills needs is the first building block of strong training and skills strategies.
  • Wage subsidies and other financial incentives – such as temporary social security exemptions – for employers who recruit young people can help improve school-to-work transitions

 

NEET Statistics – Quarterly Brief – February 2012

NEET Statistics – Quarterly Brief – February 2012

  • The current proportion of young people aged 16-18 who are NEET is much lower than in the 1980s, and has declined since a recent peak in 2005.
  • Quarter 4, 2011 NEET 16-24 was 15.9 per cent, up 0.3 per cent on the same period in 2010
  • The latest SFR NEET rate for 16-18 year olds, at end 2010, was 7.3 percent; the lowest level since consistent records began in 1994.
  • London has the lowext 16-18 NEET of all the English Regions