Inequality in Healthy Life Expectancy

Inequality in Healthy Life Expectancy at Birth by National Deciles of Area Deprivation, England 2010-12:

  • Males in the most deprived areas have a life expectancy 9.1 years shorter (when measured by the range) than males in the least deprived areas; they also spend a smaller proportion of their shorter lives in ‘Good’ health (70.8% compared to 85.0%).
  • Females in the most deprived areas have a life expectancy 6.8 years shorter (when measured by the range) than females in the least deprived areas; they also expect to spend 17.2% less of their life in ‘Good’ health (66.1% compared to 83.2%).
  • Males in the most advantaged areas can expect to live 19.4 years longer in ‘Good’ health than those in the least advantaged areas as measured by the Slope Index of Inequality (SII). For females this was 19.8 years.

A fall in NEETs

NEET Quarterly Brief – January to March 2014: DfE

The proportion of young people NEET fell across all summary age groups and was the lowest on record for 16-18 year olds.

  • This was driven by a fall in the proportion of each age group not in education or training (NET) and a rise in the employment rate of the NET group.
  • The 16-18 NEET rate fell 1.5 percentage points in the year to January to March 2014 to 6.7% which is the lowest since comparable data began in 2001.
  • The 19-24 NEET rate fell by 2.3 percentage points (to 15.9%) in the same period and the overall 16-24 rate fell by 2.0 percentage points* (to 13.1%)

The NET rate also fell across all summary age groups.

  • The proportion of 16-18 and 16-24 year olds NET in January to March 2014 was the lowest since comparable data began in 2001.
  • The NET rate for 16-18 year olds was 13.3% which is a fall of 1.4 percentage points in the year including a fall of 1.6 percentage points in the proportion of 16 year olds NET.
  • The 19-24 NET rate fell by 0.6 percentage points (to 57.5%) and the overall 16-24 NET rate fell by 0.8 percentage points (to 43.9%)
  • The 16, 17 and 18 year old NET rates were all the lowest since comparable data began in 2001.

 

Median household incomes

Median household income: ONS

  • Growth in UK median household disposable income since 1977 has closely mirrored growth in GDP per person, rising during periods of economic growth and falling after the recessions of the early 1980s, early 1990s and late 2000s.
  • Since the start of the economic downturn, median household income for the overall population has fallen by 3.8%, after adjusting for inflation.
  • However, when looking separately at non-retired and retired households, the median income for non-retired households fell by 6.4% between 2007/08 and 2011/12, while the median income for retired households grew by 5.1%.
  • Between 2007/08 and 2011/12, average income from employment and investments for the middle fifth of non-retired households fell from £37,900 to £32,600.
  • Cash benefits for the middle fifth of non-retired households rose from £3,100 to £4,600 between 2007/08 and 2011/12. As a result, the average proportion of gross income coming from cash benefits increased from 7.6% to 12.3% for this group.
  • Average direct taxes paid by the middle fifth of non-retired households have fallen from £8,700 in 2007/08 to £6,800 in 2011/12. As a percentage of gross income, this is equivalent to a fall from 21.1% to 18.3%.
  • The average amount paid in indirect taxes by the middle fifth of non-retired households also fell between 2007/08 and 2011/12, from £6,400 to £6,000, partly reflecting falling average expenditure. However, as a proportion of gross income, indirect taxes rose from 15.6% to 16.2% over this period, due to gross income falling at a faster rate.

Demography – businesses

Business Demography, 2012: ONS

  • The number of business births increased by 8,000 (3.1 %) between 2011 and 2012.
  • The number of business deaths increased by 25,000 (11.0%) between 2011 and 2012.
  • In 2012 the births of new businesses (270,000) was greater than business deaths (255,000).
  • The move towards economic recovery has seen birth rates being higher than death rates from 2011, but the gap has narrowed in 2012.
  • London had the highest business birth rate at 14.8% and the highest death rate at 11.7%. Apart from London the number of birth and deaths by region were similar.
  • In broad industry terms, accommodation and food services had the highest death rate, at 13.3%.