Anti-Social Behaviour, 2011/12

Anti-Social Behaviour, 2011/12: ONS/Crime Survey for England and Wales

  • According to the 2011/12 Crime Survey for England and Wales (CSEW), overall, 15% of adults had a high level of perceived anti-social behaviour (ASB) in their local area in the last 12 months, showing no change from the previous year.
  • One in ten (10%) believed that the level of anti-social behaviour in their local area over the past few years had ‘gone up a lot’, in comparison with almost half (49%) who believed that in England and Wales it had ‘gone up a lot’.
  • Thirty per cent of people had personally experienced or witnessed at least one incident of anti-social behaviour in their local area in the last 12 months.
  • The most common type of anti-social behaviour experienced or witnessed – by around one in eight (12%) – was drink related behaviour. Of those respondents who experienced drink related behaviour and were asked further details, 7% reported witnessing this type of behaviour every/almost every day and around a third (32%) at least once a week.
  • According to the 2012 Commercial Victimisation Survey (CVS), overall, an estimated 12% of business premises (across the four sectors covered by the survey) had experienced at least one incident of anti-social behaviour in the 12 months prior to interview.
  • Of these 12% of business premises that reported being affected, drink related behaviour and groups hanging around on the street were the most frequently experienced types of anti-social behaviour, affecting around one-third (35%) of such premises.
  • Drink related behaviour was the most commonly experienced type of anti-social behaviour in premises in the accommodation and food sector, which includes pubs and restaurants, affecting 43% of those premises that had experienced ASB. Problems with groups hanging around on the street was the most commonly experienced type of anti-social behaviour in the retail and wholesale sector, affecting 40% of those premises that had experienced ASB.
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